86th Annual Conference Schedule

A TOTAL OF 13 CE CREDITS ARE AVAILABLE

Program is subject to change at any time without notice

*CE Credits not awarded for these activities

Thursday, April 28, 2022

 7:30 a.m.

Breakfast and Networking* (Foyer)

8:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary Session, Welcome (Regency Ballroom)

8:45 a.m.

Keynote Address: When Toxic Ideas Infect Minds: Clinical Applications of the Science of Mental Immunity (Regency Ballroom)

Andy Norman, Ph.D.
Ph.D., Philosophy, Northwestern University

Researchers have found that our minds have immune systems, just as our bodies do. But where bodily immune systems protect us from infectious microbes, mental immune systems protect us from infectious ideas. These systems function imperfectly, of course, so bad ideas frequently infect minds. Such ideas—which can be thought of as mind-parasites—range from the mundane (a mistaken belief about the risks of Covid vaccines) to the delusional (a cabal of Satan-worshipping pedophiles runs our nation). The emerging science of mental immunity affords exciting new ways to think about extremism, conspiracy thinking, science denial, and partisan division. It also points to promising antidotes, among them mind-inoculation techniques and better approaches to teaching critical thinking. I call the emerging science of mental immunity “cognitive immunology.” I think this science will play a critical role in protecting future generations from outbreaks of viral nonsense. To get there, though, we need to develop the science and apply its findings. That’s where psychologists and mental health professionals like you come in: you can integrate the insights of cognitive immunology into your clinical approach and help strengthen your clients’ mental immune systems. You can enhance their ability to spot dysfunctional ideas and equip them to shed assumptions that aren’t serving them well. The key is to employ clarifying questions in a particular way: a way that boosts mental immune health. In fact, clarifying questions are arguably the antibodies of the mind.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe how the mind’s immune system works
  2. Identify ways that mental immune systems fail
  3. List ways to enhance mental immune function

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Introductory

  

10:00 a.m.

Break and Exhibit Viewing* (Foyer)

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field. 

10:15 a.m.

How to Help Clients Shed Dysfunctional Ideas: Clinical Applications of the Socratic Method (Regency Ballroom)

Andy Norman, Ph.D.
Ph.D., Philosophy, Northwestern University

Human beings are constantly taking on ideas that don’t serve them well. We’re taken in by disinformation and swayed by propaganda; we’re seduced by conspiracy theories and prone to wishful thinking; we believe falsehoods and take on assumptions that limit us. So how do you help someone who has contracted a harmful idea? What if they’ve grown attached to the idea, and resistant to changing it? In this session, Andy Norman, author of Mental Immunity, will talk about how we can all get better at spotting and shedding problematic ideas. He’ll share his quasi-Socratic approach to encouraging cognitive growth, a method that stresses “subtractive” learning while gently boosting immunity to dysfunctional attitudes. The session will be highly interactive and may involve role-playing.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Spot circumstances where an application of the Socratic Method can help a client.
  2. Employ elements of the Socratic Method to promote reflection, subtractive learning, and healing.

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

                                                                                                                                                  Introductory

11:45 a.m.

Lunch* (Europa Dining)

12:45 p.m.

Adult Obesity and its Relationship to Childhood Trauma (Conference Room D)

Thyra Fossum, Ph.D., LP.
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University

Paul Bagdade, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology, University of Minnesota

Obesity rates in this country and around the world have nearly tripled in the last 50 years. There are many factors contributing to this epidemic. This presentation will focus specifically on the common experience of childhood trauma in adults with obesity, protective factors, and psychological interventions. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can have profound effects on physical and emotional health as well as behavior and cognition in adults. The more adverse or traumatic events a child experiences, the greater likelihood of health problems including obesity as an adult. The role of protective factors that can help people to be more resilient, despite early trauma, will also be discussed. Finally, participants will learn about psychological treatments including mindfulness, meditation, and self-compassion that can improve both mental health and behavioral factors related to obesity.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Define and assess adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and how they may affect obesity.
  2. Identify psychological treatment options for obesity patients with childhood trauma.

The speakers have indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Intermediate

12:45 p.m. 

Cultural Intersection of Behavioral Health Care and Assessment with our Native American Population (Regency Ballroom)

Geoffrey Ammerman, M.S.Ed., LP
M.S. Ed., Community Counseling, University of Wisconsin-Superior

Carol DeVereny M.S.W.
University of Minnesota - Duluth

There are 567 registered Tribes in the Nation. We are going to talk about one of them, The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. Trauma attempts at cultural assimilation, acculturation, colonization, not only of the lands but of the mind has played a major role in skewing testing, behavioral interventions, and the understanding of the impact of this trauma upon the overall mental health of our community. From our perspective, there is little awareness of the impact of trauma, historic, complex, acute as well as a gross misinterpretation of the obtained data and how it truly manifests behaviorally. We would like to give you an overview of the culture, people, and a basic overview of how testing can be misinterpreted in our population. It is our goal to give you a nascent understanding of Fond du Lac, it’s culture and people and how best to begin to understand the unique needs of our community when it comes to behavioral health needs and what constitutes treatment.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Recognize the role of Native Culture as it applies to behavioral health services
  2. Recognize issues with standardized testing with Native Americans
  3. Recognize the impact of the dominant western culture upon the mental health of Native Americans

The speakers have indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Introductory

12:45 p.m. 

Enhancing the Efficacy of Exposure Therapy in Treating Anxiety Disorders (Conference Room E)

Brittany Lynn Quimby, Psy.D., M.S.Ed.
Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM)

This presentation is tailored towards the treatment of anxiety and will help mental health providers better understand the role of uncertainty in the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. The presentation will discuss advances in exposure and response preventions (ERP) and explain how to use this approach with many clinical presentations aside from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Case examples and treatment plans for a variety of anxiety disorders will be discussed and practiced. Additionally, attendees will learn how they may be accidentally reinforcing fears in session and inadvertently worsening anxiety symptoms.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe and apply advances in the research of exposure therapy.
  2. Identify ways of reinforcing fears and how to navigate nuanced challenges with anxiety disorders.
  3. Explain the role of uncertainty in the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders and  how to apply such knowledge to interventions in session.

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Intermediate

2:00 p.m.

Exhibit Viewing* (Foyer)

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

2:00 p.m.

Poster Viewing (Conference Room C)

This session provides an opportunity to review research studies, innovative clinical interventions, and case studies through engagement with researchers, program developers and clinicians who are presenting their work. CE credits are available for those who spend this hour in the poster viewing area.

3:00 p.m.

Destigmatizing Remediation and Supporting Trainees with Problems of Professional Competence (Regency Ballroom)

Ashley Sovereign, Psy.D., LP
Psy.D., Counseling Psychology, University of St. Thomas

Salina Renninger, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology, University of Minnesota

Katie Grinde, M.A.
M.A., Clinical Psychology, Argosy University

Jingyou Zhu, M.A.
M.A., Counseling Psychology, University of Minnesota

The psychological training community lacks a common understanding of important concepts and processes related to trainees’ competency development. While definitions of profession-wide competencies and competency benchmarks have been increasingly refined and focused, supervisors, faculty, and students are often unclear about what remedial steps need to be taken to achieve competency when problems have been identified. As gatekeepers, trainers and supervisors are tasked with providing scaffolding to help trainees develop but may struggle to create useful and effective remediation plans. Perceiving remediation as disciplinary or punitive may inhibit supervisors from engaging in helpful and needed remedial work with trainees, particularly in early stages of professional development. Trainees who have been identified as demonstrating problems of professional competence may be best assisted by a destigmatizing approach to remediation that conceptualizes the problem beyond the individual trainee. This approach emphasizes a relational connection and an ongoing philosophy of competency development embedded within a community of providers. This presentation we will consider best practices for remediation with psychological trainees at different levels demonstrating problems of professional competence.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe communitarian and ecological models of conceptualizing and intervening when problems of professional competence are demonstrated by psychological trainees.
  2. Apply best practices in remediation when working with trainees demonstrating problems of professional competence.

The speakers have indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Intermediate

3:00 p.m.

A Rolling Pandemic, an Increased Demand for Care, Fatigue… Burnout, What Work-Life Balance? (Conference Room C)

Signe Nestingen, Ph.D., LP, LMFT
Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, University of St. Thomas

Catherine Cronemeyer, Psy.D., LP, LLC
Psy.D., Counseling Psychology, University of St. Thomas

Anna Tierney, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Saint Louis University

How are you? Are you feeling pressure, exhaustion, distress, and apathy of the chronic and enduring effects of the last 18 months without a definitive end in sight? As mental health professionals we know that this is a recipe for burnout. In this session we will define and examine burnout, review rates of burnout among mental health professional, and discuss the potential effects of burnout personally, professionally, and ethically. We will present a sustainable model of self-reflection designed to enhance the skill sets of ethical practice, self-care, and well-being. We will discuss ways to implement the principle of self-reflection to increase work-life balance. Participants will come away from this session with the following: 1. an understanding of the signs of burnout. 2. how burnout may contribute to ethical risks, impact clinical work, and lead to negative impacts on well-being. 3. knowledge of self-reflection and it’s protective factors. 4 an effective plan for burnout management and increased resilience.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Recognize increased vulnerability to burnout given the many current stressors (e.g., global pandemic, social justice issues, increased demand for mental health services, ecological challenges) and the impact they have on psychological practice.
  2. Examine self-reflective techniques, practices and behaviors to increase resilience and scaffolding for ethical decision making in complex times.
  3. Post presentation, apply self-reflective techniques to create a long-term, sustainable plan to support yourself in clinical work and ethical practice.

 

The speakers have indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Intermediate
3:00 p.m. 

Considerations When Working with a Client That is Living with a Disability (Conference Room D)


Elizabeth Fleming, Psy.D.
Psy.D., Counseling Psychology; Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Sheridan Anderson, M.A.
MA Counseling and Psychological Services; St Mary’s University of Minnesota

Disabilities appear in many different forms - visible and invisible. According to the 2018 American Community Survey, the number of Minnesotans reporting a disability ranged from 5-45%, depending on age. While we often discuss the impact of a disability on one's daily life, functioning, and relationships, we do not regularly examine how we, as professionals in the field of Psychology, can interact and respond effectively. This session focuses on defining the term 'disability', the influence of stigma as it relates to disabilities, and considerations for working with persons with disabilities.

  1. Explain the varying presentations of disability status
  2. Demonstrate the ways in which bias contributes to the treatment of, and interactions with, persons with disabilities
  3. Apply best practices in working with persons with disabilities in therapeutic and organizational settings 

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Introductory

3:00 p.m. 

Complex Issues in Child Psychology: When Legal Matters Enter Therapy (Conference Room E)

Sharon Stein McNamara, Ed.D., LP
Ed.D., Psychology and Human Development, Harvard University Graduate School

Gay Rosenthal, M.A., LP
M.A., Educational Psychology, University of Minnesota

Laurel Ferris, M.A.
Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago

Many child psychologists find themselves involved in cases that enter the legal realm and become a court-involved therapist without being fully aware that the therapy case is going that direction. This brief overview will look at cases that start out as child therapy cases, and the psychologist becomes involved in coping with a divorce, post-decree custody, parental alienation or reunification, after starting out the case as a non-court involved therapist. The presentation will look at red flags, or things to be aware of to avoid problems down the road when asked to reveal records or to provide an opinion in a court-related manner.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List red flags that indicate the child psychology therapy case may become a court involved case.
  2. Analyze how to create a checklist of ways to prevent ethical concerns in your child psychology practice.
  3. Explain how to manage unintended court involvement in child therapy.  

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Intermediate
4:15 p.m.

Reception, Networking, PINGO, and Awards* (Europa Dining)

 
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Friday, April 29, 2022

7:30 a.m.

Breakfast and Networking* (Foyer)

8:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary Session, Welcome (Regency Ballroom)

8:45 a.m.

Keynote Address: Resilience in Science and Practice: Progress and Promise (Regency Ballroom)

Ann Masten, Ph.D., LP

Dr. Masten will highlight recent advances in research on resilience in human development and their implications for practice, including reflections on human adaptation during the pandemic. She will describe contemporary definitions of resilience that underscore multisystem processes and the importance of defining resilience for scalability across system levels (from neurobiological and individual levels to community and global socioecological levels) and portability across disciplines concerned with human well-being in diverse cultures. Resilience refers to the capacity of a system (child, family, community, economy, etc.) to adapt successfully to challenges that threaten the function, survival, or development of the system. Individual resilience depends on interactions among multiple systems and particularly relationships and social support, together with resources and opportunities. This perspective on resilience has gained salience for multiple reasons, including the infusion of systems theory into developmental psychopathology and the necessity of integrating knowledge on resilience from different disciplines to address mass-trauma threats such as pandemics, war, or natural disasters. Dr. Masten will highlight the alignment of findings in research on resilience in children, families, and communities, the transdiagnostic significance of protective processes, and implications of resilience models for practice and policy. Exciting new directions for integrated research and practice and intriguing questions for future research will be delineated.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Define resilience from a multisystem perspective for scalability and collaboration across disciplines
  2. Apply a resilience framework for research and for practice
  3. Describe emerging directions of research on resilience

The presenter has a 2014 book, Ordinary Magic: Resilience in Development, still in print.

                                                                                                                                                Intermediate

10:00 a.m.

Exhibit Viewing and Break* (Foyer)

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

10:15 a.m.

Keynote Address Continued: Resilience in Science and Practice: Progress and Promise (Regency Ballroom)

Ann Masten, Ph.D., LP

See above for session details. 

11:45 a.m. 

Lunch* (Europa Dining)

12:45 p.m. 

Requesting Services for our Clients that Might Need a Waiver (Conference Room C)

Amy Carrison, Ph.D. 

  1. Describe the services available to clients outside therapy office.
  2. Identify assessment tools often needed to obtain services.
  3. Describe the services available to children and adults through medical assistance.
12:45 p.m.

Therapist Resilience and Development in an Ever-Changing World (Regency Ballroom)

Sarah Cronin, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology, University of Minnesota
Tom Allen, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology, University of Minnesota
Tom Skovholt, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri
Jian-Ming Hou, Ph.D., LP
Ph.D., Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology, University of Minnesota

In the context of heightened anxiety and work demands during a global pandemic, therapists need resilience now more than ever. Dr. Thomas Skovholt will provide a history of therapist resilience and counselor development research. He will briefly review the iconic counselor development study that was published as The Developing Practitioner (Ronnestad& Skovholt, 2013), the master therapist research series (Jennings & Skovholt, 1999), qualitative work that supported The Resilient Practitioner (Skovholt & Trotter-Matthison, 2016), and a recent framework about Characteristics of Highly Resilient Therapists (Hou & Skovholt, 2020). Drs. Sarah Cronin & Tom Allen will then review results of a recent international systematic review studying internal characteristics that contribute to therapist resilience (Cronin, Allen, Hou & Walker, under review). Twenty-nine peer-reviewed original research articles were systematically collected and coded for themes. Ten overarching themes were identified that reinforce the four course Characteristics of Highly Resilient Therapists (Hou & Skvoholt, 2020). Findings have implications for fostering therapist resilience. Attendees will be encouraged to self-reflect about their own resilience and consider how their current stage of counselor development relates to their current functioning. There will be time for discussion aimed at supporting attendees to leave with a deeper understanding of their own resilience as practitioners.

  1. Describe how resilient practitioner research has evolved over time
  2. Analyze how one's current stage of counselor development relates to their current resilience
  3. Identify action steps to continue pursuing resilience as practitioners

 

The speakers have indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.                        Intermediate

 

12:45 p.m.

Promoting Resilience through Connection with Nature (Conference Room E)

Jaime Ascencio, Ph.D., HTR
Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, Colorado State University

This presentation focuses on how providers can use nature-based interventions to improve resilience for their clients and themselves. Specific examples are provided at multiple intervention levels, including methods of increasing nature contact in-session, adjusting current interventions to include a nature component, and introducing nature-based interventions. Research support for theoretical underpinnings, the healing impact of specific elements of natural environments, and nature's effect on resilience are discussed.

  1. Describe the theoretical backing of nature-based interventions
  2. Identify healing components of natural environments
  3. Apply methods of incorporating nature work into current interventions with clients

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest                                                                                                                                                                                            Introductory

12:45 p.m.

Cognitive and Emotional Functioning in Patients with Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) or “Long COVID” (Conference Room D)

Douglas Whiteside, Ph.D., ABPP
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

COVID-19 is perhaps the most serious public health crisis in decades due to the widespread impact on society and individuals, and cognitive complaints have been associated with this disorder. This presentation will examine the common issues neuropsychologists face when evaluating adults COVID-19 patients. Initial research in adults will be discussed to help understand the cognitive and emotional outcomes in patients with longer term symptomatology, called post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) or "Long COVID." Initial group data and case presentations will illustrate common issues seen in adults with long-term COVID-19 complaints.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe common cognitive complaints in long Covid patients
  2. Describe research findings on the cognitive and emotional outcomes in long Covid patients

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest

Intermediate 

2:00 p.m.

Exhibit Viewing* (Foyer)

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

2:00 p.m.

Poster Viewing (Board Room 1)

This session provides an opportunity to review research studies, innovative clinical interventions, and case studies through engagement with researchers, program developers and clinicians who are presenting their work. CE credits are available for those who spend this hour in the poster viewing area.

3:00 p.m.

Overview of Assessment of Trauma and Dissociative Spectrum Disorders (Regency Ballroom)

Jeffery Hill, Psy.D., LP*
Psy.D., General and Child Psychology, Argosy University

Meghan Clifford, Psy.D., LP*
Psy.D., Counseling Psychology, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

This presentation is an overview of a complex training created for the assessment of complex trauma and dissociative spectrum of disorders. Attendees will develop an understanding of trauma spectrum disorders, assessment and diagnostic methods and considerations, and learn differential diagnosis and clinical presentation of symptoms associated with trauma spectrum disorders. Attendees will gain understanding of the neurology of trauma, basic knowledge related to assessments, and an overview of the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the Trauma Symptoms Inventory, 2nd Ed (TSI-2) and the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). Attendees will also gain basic understanding of how to develop research-based, flexible test batteries for the assessment of individuals experiencing complex trauma related disorders, review current research on complex trauma when interpreting the MMPI-2, and review best practices surrounding trauma and dissociation assessment.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe trauma spectrum disorders, etiology, prevalence rates, symptoms, differential diagnosis, neurology of trauma, current research, and risk factors of disorders with underlying complex trauma etiology.
  2. Apply research-based, flexible test batteries for the assessment of individuals experiencing complex trauma related disorders, and using the MMPI-2 in trauma-based evaluations
  3. Explain the best practices surrounding trauma and dissociation assessment.

Conflict of Interest: We conduct a two-day version of this course through Parker Collins Family Mental Health clinic, one offering so far.

Intermediate

3:00 p.m. 

Helping to Reclaim the “I” in Life (Conference Room C)

Mary Auster Shanesy, Psy.D., LP
Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Wisconsin School of Professional Psychology

Becoming the Hero of Your Own Life is a compassionate, easy to understand approach for everyone who wants to learn their own truth, to see without assumptions or judgments, and to make decisions and choices based on what's right, and what's best for them. We've all dreamed of a life of happiness, purpose, meaning, but somehow the "facts" of life seem to get in our way. You know the "facts"- all those "you have to," you can't," you're not" - things that keep us from living. But what if those "facts" of our lives are, in fact, a lie? What if our world, our lives, our selves are built on a fabric of lies so familiar and pervasive that we never even think to question them? And if we had the real, unwavering ability to see the truth and turn away from the lies, we would look through the eyes of truth to free ourselves from the lies that are the source of depression, anxiety, trauma, substance abuse, loss, and grief. The lies that have prevented us from having that life we've dreamed of. Becoming The Hero of Your Own Life allows everyone to reclaim the "I" in Life, and live the life they've always dreamed of.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify the Great and Personal lies that keep people from their own authentic happiness
  2. Describe the skills needed to become an Objective Observer on the road to becoming a Hero
  3. Demonstrate ways lies can be challenged and changed

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Intermediate

3:00 p.m. 

The Exploration of Addiction Through a Grief and Loss Lens (Conference Room D)

Fiyyaz Karim, Psy.D.
Psy.D., Counseling Psychology, University of St. Thomas

Grief can serve as a catalyst for addiction as individuals may turn to substances or addictive behaviors to cope with losses in their lives. Giving up an addiction and navigating sobriety also elicits a bereavement process for many in recovery. It can have an impact on a wide array of secondary losses such as identity, structure/routine, and relationships. Further, these untreated losses could lead to comorbidity with other mental health and psychosocial concerns such as anxiety, depression, trauma, or the increased susceptibility to relapse for the person in recovery. This workshop will explore the conceptualization of individuals navigating sobriety from a grief and loss perspective. It will examine the different areas of loss for individuals in recovery, the application of grief and loss theory, the impact of these losses, and interventions to work with the grieving process of individuals recovering from an addiction. The workshop will also discuss special considerations in working with this population in light of larger community losses like the pandemic and Covid-19.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the grieving process of the loss of a loved one due to death and dying versus losses as the result of navigating sobriety
  2. Analyze the areas of impact associated with grief in recovery
  3. Describe the conceptualization of grief and addiction through the application of grief and loss theories
  4. Explain interventions in which professionals can work with the grieving process of addiction

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest.

Introductory

3:00 p.m.

Reporting Results from the MN All Payer Claim Database (Conference Room E)

Heather Simmer, M.A.
Psy.D., Counseling and Psychological Services, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

This research takes a first look at a unique Public Use File (PUF) from the Minnesota Department of Health’s, Health Economics Program’s, All Payer Claims Database (MN APCD). This PUF accounts for 89% of Minnesotans of all ages with health coverage in 2017 and offers data on payments made to providers by both commercial and public payers; information that has historically been difficult to capture and compare. This research represents a first attempt to explore and evaluate reimbursement patterns and differences in public and commercial payment rate. Methods utilized explored the archival dataset included an exploratory qualitative retrospective analysis, which focused primarily on median total amounts charged, percentages of total billing amounts paid, total amounts paid by provider type, site of service, geographic location, and rate of use. Findings showed that psychologists who bill through an employer are reimbursed by commercial insurers similarly to Medicare and MN Health Care Programs and are paid more by commercial payers by an amount equal to member copayments. Psychologists who bill through employers are also paid slightly higher but at the identical percentage rate of licensed independent clinical social workers, slightly more in suburban settings and slightly less in micropolitan areas. Results of this study are intended to increase transparency in healthcare payment patterns, increase parity for psychologists in MN, inform MN public health policy, and contribute to future healthcare payment reform research using APCD’s.

  1. Demonstrate payment patterns for clinical psychologists in the state of MNAnalyze
  2. Compare differences between commercial, Medicare and MN Health Care programs payments to providers

The speaker has indicated they do not have any conflicts of interest. 

Introductory

4:15 p.m.

Conference Adjourns

Bring completed CE attendance log to the registration table. Complete the evaluation that you will receive via email and your certificate will be emailed back to you within 10 business days.

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Each session is of a certain level as indicated by its presenter(s). The various levels are:
Introductory: Assumes post-doctoral education status and limited familiarity with topic.
Intermediate: Assumes post-doctoral education status and general familiarity with topic.
Advanced: Assumes post-doctoral education status and some specialized knowledge of topic.

*These presenters have reported the following conflicts of interest:

Jeffery Hill, Psy.D., LP*
We conduct a two-day version of this course through Parker Collins Family Mental Health clinic, one offering so far. 

Meghan Clifford, Psy.D., LP*
We conduct a two-day version of this course through Parker Collins Family Mental Health clinic, one offering so far. 

If you have questions about MPA's programs or speakers, please contact MPA at [email protected].