83rd Annual Conference Schedule

A TOTAL OF 14.5 CE CREDITS ARE AVAILABLE

Click here to register for the conference.

Program is subject to change at any time without notice

*CE Credits not awarded for these activities

Thursday, April 11, 2019

 8:00 a.m.

Breakfast and Networking*

8:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary Session and Welcome

Keynote Address: Why People Die by Suicide

Thomas Joiner, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Psychology Department of Psychology, Florida State

In his new theory of suicidal behavior, Dr. Thomas Joiner proposes three factors that mark those most at risk of death: the feeling of being a burden on loved ones; the sense of isolation; and the learned ability to hurt oneself. He tests the theory against diverse facts taken from clinical anecdotes, history, literature, popular culture, anthropology, epidemiology, genetics, and neurobiology.  Facts about suicide rates among a number of populations will be addressed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe basic fact about the epidemiology and risk factors for death by suicide.
  2. Describe a new theory of suicidal behavior.
  3. List approaches to suicide risk assessment.
  4. List developments in the treatment of suicidal behavior.
  5. Describe developments in suicide prevention.
  6. List three factors that mark those at risk of death from suicide.

Intermediate 

 9:45 a.m.

Therapeutic Conversations with Queer Youth & Their Families: Honoring Resistance, Cultivating Connections (Part 1 of 3)

Julie Tilsen, M.A., LP, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Consultant and trainer, Independent Practice

Queer youth face many challenges in a heteronormative and increasingly homonormative world. Constructing and maintaining a queer identity within the dominance of the gender and sexual binaries and essentialist notions of “the self” are among these challenges. This workshop will consider conceptual and conversational resources that provide an alternative relational practice informed by queer theory (e.g., Butler, Duggan, Foucault, Sedgwick, Warner) and dialogical practices (e.g., Madigan, McNamee, Tomm, White & Epston). These concepts and practices open up conversational space that is honoring of queer youth and their families and allows for the discursive production of multiple and fluid relational identities. The workshop is experiential and interactive and focuses on applying theory in a productive way toward practices that are generative and meaningful for clients and therapists alike. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the ways in which the history of sexuality influences traditional notions of gender, sexuality, and identity development, and impacts therapeutic practice and the concepts that inform it.
  2. Describe concepts and terms fundamental to queer theory and related theoretical resources.
  3. Analyze ideas about gender and sexuality and the role of cultural narratives (e.g., medicine, psychology, religion, media) on these ideas.
  4. Describe the relationship between cultural discourses and personal narratives of identity.
  5. Apply discursive practices informed by queer theory in therapeutic work with queer youth and their families.
  6. Demonstrate integration of a queer theory-informed practice into their particular practice context.

Introductory

 9:45 a.m.

Suicide Trends in Minnesota: A Public Health Approach to Suicide Prevention

Melissa Heinen, M.P.H.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health

Amy Maheswaran Lopez, M.S.W.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health Center for Health Promotion Injury and Violence Prevention Section; State Suicide Prevention Coordinator

Minnesota Department of Health conducts surveillance on all violent injury deaths in Minnesota, including deaths by suicide. Participants will gain a better understanding of the prevalence of suicide in Minnesota and the demographic populations greatest at risk in Minnesota. We will share the public health approach to suicide prevention along with best practices. Suicide IS preventable.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Apply what was learned to educate colleagues and the broader community on the prevalence of suicide and populations most affected.
  2. Describe best practices for helping persons that are at risk of suicide.

Introductory

 9:45 a.m.

Assumed Safe: Employee Perceptions and Safety Concerns Regarding Potential Workplace Violence

Amy E. Helfritz, Psy.D., M.Ed.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Controlling Chaos, LLC / Owner

Clinicians and mental health workers who notice clientele presenting with signs of stress or anxiety due to unidentified causes can further address the client’s work environment to assess the client’s perception of safety at work, and potential underlying safety concerns. Providing insight and awareness regarding the idea that clients may have underlying safety concerns about potential workplace violence, particularly in environments where safety concerns are not necessarily expected, will allow clinicians and mental health workers to screen for this possibility with their clientele. This program will discuss the perceptions and safety concerns of employees regarding potential workplace violence occurring in assumed low-risk environments where safety, while assumed, may not be realistic. It will provide insight into how employees' mental health may be impacted when working in these environments, based on original research conducted by the program presenter.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe how individuals' safety concerns regarding potential workplace violence can impact mental health.
  2. Analyze how the concept of assumed low-risk environments may affect their own clients.
  3. Apply research findings (presented during the program) to their own clients, in an effort to better address clients' specific mental health needs.

Introductory

  9:45 a.m.

Working with the Geriatric Client

Susan McPherson, Ph.D., ABPP, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Independent Practice, Edina, MN

Michael Sharland, Ph.D., ABPP, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Essentia Health Systems, Duluth, MN

According to the 2010 census, persons 65 years or older, numbered 40.2 million representing and 13% of the U.S. population, are about one in every eight Americans. By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons, more than twice their number in 2000. People 65+ represented 12.4% of the population in the year 2000 but are expected to grow to be 19% of the population by 2030. This growing population will require that psychologists and neuropsychologists understand the issues specific to working with this clinical population.  The clinical interview of an elderly individual who may have cognitive decline poses important issues for psychologists and neuropsychologists.  We will stress the importance of a thorough history, family/collateral input, medical history and medications including OTC; sleep, social support, stressors, mood; psychiatric history, and substance abuse (just some examples).  

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe key factors that impact working with an older adult v.s. younger adults (e.g., decreased vision, hearing, pain).
  2. List (10) domains that should be addressed when interviewing older adults.
  3. Describe signs of elder abuse.

Introductory

11:00 a.m.

Exhibit Viewing*

Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field. 

11:15 a.m.

Therapeutic Conversations with Queer Youth & Their Families: Honoring Resistance, Cultivating Connections (Part 2 of 3)

Julie Tilsen, M.A., LP, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Consultant and trainer, Independent Practice

Queer youth face many challenges in a heteronormative and increasingly homonormative world. Constructing and maintaining a queer identity within the dominance of the gender and sexual binaries and essentialist notions of “the self” are among these challenges. This workshop will consider conceptual and conversational resources that provide an alternative relational practice informed by queer theory (e.g., Butler, Duggan, Foucault, Sedgwick, Warner) and dialogical practices (e.g., Madigan, McNamee, Tomm, White & Epston). These concepts and practices open up conversational space that is honoring of queer youth and their families and allows for the discursive production of multiple and fluid relational identities. The workshop is experiential and interactive and focuses on applying theory in a productive way toward practices that are generative and meaningful for clients and therapists alike. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the ways in which the history of sexuality influences traditional notions of gender, sexuality, and identity development, and impacts therapeutic practice and the concepts that inform it.
  2. Describe concepts and terms fundamental to queer theory and related theoretical resources.
  3. Analyze ideas about gender and sexuality and the role of cultural narratives (e.g., medicine, psychology, religion, media) on these ideas.
  4. Describe the relationship between cultural discourses and personal narratives of identity.
  5. Apply discursive practices informed by queer theory in therapeutic work with queer youth and their families.
  6. Demonstrate integration of a queer theory-informed practice into their particular practice context.

Introductory

11:15 a.m.

Helpful Tools to Prevent and Reduce Suicides

Melissa Dau, M.S.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health; Regional Youth Suicide Prevention

Stephanie Downey, B.S.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health, Youth Suicide Prevention Coordinator

Tanya Carter, B.A.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health, Behavioral Health Care Liaison

Participants will learn about specific tools and resources available to them and their organizations for preventing suicide on a system level. A number of evidence-based practices or best practices have demonstrated success nationally such as suicide prevention trainings, Community Readiness Assessments and the Zero Suicide Model. Participants will learn how these tools may be accessed and replicated in local communities of Minnesota.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Apply what is learned to access tools in their work on system approaches for suicide prevention.

Intermediate

11:15 a.m.

Implementing Neuofeedback as an Adjunct to our Current Therapies

Mary Zaudtke, MA, LP; Chris Wheeler Doe, LMFT
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: A Time For Healing, LLC 

Neurofeedback is a training that helps the brain learn to increase or decrease certain brain waves or connectivity often associated with different behaviors. Clients in therapy may have difficulty participating because of their symptoms of dysregulation that interfere with their ability to be present, aware or to relate to others. Neurofeedback has been proposed as a therapy that helps settle the central nervous system sufficiently to allow acquisition of new information. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe neurofeedback, and how it works in conjunction with psychotherapy in our practices.
  2. List scenarios in which a client might be referred for neurofeedback.
  3. Describe cautions and reasonable expectations for the use of neurofeedback.
  4. Describe the difference between neurofeedback and stimulation technologies.

Introductory

11:15 a.m.

What's New in Gender Health: Update from the National Center for Gender Spectrum Health

Dianne Berg, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Program in Human Sexuality, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota

The National Center for Gender Spectrum Health (NCGSH) The Gender Affirmative Lifespan Approach (GALA),  a philanthropic initiative of the Program in Human Sexuality at the University of MN, is the guiding framework of the NCGSH. GALA is based in theory and research that shows stigma, discrimination, and lack of access to care contribute to health disparities for transgender and gender diverse people. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe an overview of GALA, including its underlying principles and therapeutic components.
  2. Describe the GALA-based clinical applications specifically being developed to improve gender literacy and promote pleasure-oriented positive sexuality.
  3. Describe the empirical work related to measurement happening at the NCGSH.
  4. List GALA-based measures that we have developed and are now available to clinicians and researchers interested in moving the field of gender health forward.
  5. List gender-specific measurement tools that can be used in clinical practice.

Intermediate

12:45 p.m.

Lunch*

2:00 p.m.

Therapeutic Conversations with Queer Youth & Their Families: Honoring Resistance, Cultivating Connections (Part 3 of 3)

Julie Tilsen, M.A., LP, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Consultant and trainer, Independent Practice

Queer youth face many challenges in a heteronormative and increasingly homonormative world. Constructing and maintaining a queer identity within the dominance of the gender and sexual binaries and essentialist notions of “the self” are among these challenges. This workshop will consider conceptual and conversational resources that provide an alternative relational practice informed by queer theory (e.g., Butler, Duggan, Foucault, Sedgwick, Warner) and dialogical practices (e.g., Madigan, McNamee, Tomm, White & Epston). These concepts and practices open up conversational space that is honoring of queer youth and their families and allows for the discursive production of multiple and fluid relational identities. The workshop is experiential and interactive and focuses on applying theory in a productive way toward practices that are generative and meaningful for clients and therapists alike. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the ways in which the history of sexuality influences traditional notions of gender, sexuality, and identity development, and impacts therapeutic practice and the concepts that inform it.
  2. Describe concepts and terms fundamental to queer theory and related theoretical resources.
  3. Analyze ideas about gender and sexuality and the role of cultural narratives (e.g., medicine, psychology, religion, media) on these ideas.
  4. Describe the relationship between cultural discourses and personal narratives of identity.
  5. Apply discursive practices informed by queer theory in therapeutic work with queer youth and their families.
  6. Demonstrate integration of a queer theory-informed practice into their particular practice context.

Introductory

2:00 p.m. 

Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR): Suicide Prevention

Catherine Gangi, M.P.H., CHES
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Health and Wellness Programs Coordinator for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota

Health and Wellness Programs Coordinator for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
Learn the three steps anyone can take to help prevent suicide. Just like CPR, QPR is an emergency response to someone in crisis and can save lives. QPR is the most widely taught gatekeeper training program in the United States, and more than one million adults have been trained in classroom settings in 48 states.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Recognize someone at risk for suicide.
  2. Intervene with those at risk.
  3. Refer them to an appropriate resource.

Introductory

2:00 p.m. 

Telehealth in Minnesota: What You Need to Know, Is It Right for You? How to Get Started

Richard Sethre, Psy.D, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Independent Practice

Telehealth and telebehavioral health services are increasingly promoted for clinical and financial reasons. Clinically, telebehavioral services can help people who have barriers to attending appointments in person, such as illness, fear, and mobility and transportation problems. Starting to provide telebehavioral services requires knowledge in a variety areas including technical resources, regulatory rules, risk management and clinical regulations. This presentation will review current telebehavioral outcomes research and the relevant sections of Minnesota Board of Psychology Practice Act and APA Code of Ethics. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe local insurance company requirements regarding conducting telebehavioral services;
  2. List the technology required, and policies and paperwork that must be obtained prior to the start of providing services;
  3. Describe clinical skills necessary to successfully, and safely, provide telebehavioral services.

Intermediate

2:00 p.m.

Legislative Efforts to Improve the Practice Environment for Psychologists

Trisha A. Stark, Ph.D., LP, M.P.A.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Independent Practice, MPA Federal Advocacy Coordinator and Chair, MPA Legislative Committee

William J Amberg, M.A., J.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Amberg Law Office; Government Relations Consultant for MPA

A central responsibility of MPA is to provide protection for psychologists, a function carried out in part by its Legislative Committee. In this presentation, we will: summarize the accomplishments of the 2018 legislative session, describe efforts underway in the current legislative session, and speculate about issues on the horizon. Highlighted issues will include the Provider Tax, efforts to increase Medical Assistance funding, and movement to license behavior analysts. Empowering members to have their viewpoints and concerns heard by government and regulatory entities will be emphasized. Ample time will be provided for member questions and input. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe current legislative issues, formulate questions for legislators, and provide input on additional legislation needed to support psychology.
  2. List three attributes of effective advocacy for psychology.

Intermediate

3:15 p.m.

Exhibit Viewing*

Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

3:15 p.m.

Poster Viewing

This session provides an opportunity to review research studies, innovative clinical interventions, and case studies through engagement with researchers, program developers and clinicians who are presenting their work. CE credits are available for those who spend this hour in the poster viewing area.

4:15 p.m.

The Stuff You’ve Been Too Embarrassed to Ask:  A Presentation and Discussion about Terminology, Definitions, and Language Associated with Sexual and Gender Diversities

Tera Jansen, Psy.D., LP, CST
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Clinical Director at Natalis Counseling & Psychology Solutions

Lisa Johnson, Psy.D., LP, LMFT
Current Work or Professional Affiliation:  Co-Owner of Natalis Counseling & Psychological Solutions

This is presentation focuses on the evolution of language as it applies to sexual and gender diversity.  Many providers of psychological and mental health services report concerns regarding the use of appropriate and accurate language when speaking with clients about sexual health and gender issues.   A potential result of these concerns may be provider avoidance of engaging in meaningful conversations about sexual health and gender.  This presentation which is based on both current evidence and clinical experience, provides a practical map for psychologists and other mental health professional in using current language associated with sexual and gender diversity.  Also included will be a discussion about the importance of language evolution in clinical work and the potential impact on client experience.   This presentation will be applicable to psychologists and other clinicians working in various clinical settings.   As this presentation is discourse based, ample time for discussion and interaction will be provided.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe common terminology, definitions, and language associated with sexual and gender diversity.
  2. Discuss and critically assess the impact of language in clinical work, particularly as it applies to sexually and gender diverse communities.

Introductory

4:15 p.m.

Cognitive Training in Early Psychosis

Aimee Murray, Psy.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota

Cognitive impairments in individuals with mental health concerns can have a significant impact on an individual’s ability to function. Interventions that address these impairments are limited. Research has demonstrated that cognitive training generates improvement in cognitive skills, symptoms and functional outcomes for individuals with psychosis. Although it has been researched for years, this intervention is just starting to be integrated into practice. This presentation will provide an overview of the research in cognitive training and provide some guidance on implementing it into a clinical setting. Participants will hear a brief history of the treatment and some general findings from the research related to a variety of mental health concerns. A primary focus of the discussion will be on the use of cognitive training for the cognitive symptoms of psychotic spectrum disorders. Outcomes and practical insights from integrating cognitive training into a first episode psychosis day treatment program for young adults will be discussed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Apply cognitive training research to clinical settings;
  2. Explain benefits and limitations of cognitive training for individuals with mental health concerns.

Intermediate

4:15 p.m. 

Evidence for Life Transformation

Tim Walsh, M.A., LP, D.P.A.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Vice President of Long Term Recovery and Mental Health Services at MN Adult and Teen Challenge

The body of empirical research on positive psychology represents a paradigm shift in the philosophy and focus of the field of counseling and human services. This body of evidence speaks to causal factors or drivers of life transformation including: spirituality, identity, life meaning and purpose, flourishing, relational health, virtues or moral strengths, motivation, optimism and hope, personal growth, happiness and joy, and resilience or grit.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List the empirical evidence of the ten drivers of life transformation.
  2. Describe the limitations of a theory of change based solely on disease, deficit and disorder models.
  3. Apply the application of positive psychology research to clinical practice.

Introductory

4:15 p.m. 

Pitfalls, Traps and Slippery Slopes: When Good Intentions are not Enough in the Complicated Terrain of Psychology and Ethics

Signe L. Nestingen, Psy.D, LP, LMFT
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Director of Clinical Training, Associate Professor, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota

Jil Leverone, Ph.D, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Assistant Professor at Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

Marie-Gabrielle Reed, Ph.D, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Reed Clinical and Forensic Services, Private Practice, Minneapolis

Andrea Zuellig, Ph.D.,LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Melrose Center; MPA Ethics Committee Chair

Even the most experienced psychologists with good intentions struggle with ethically ambiguous situations, finding themselves challenged about next best steps they may take to address them.  Join four members of the MPA Ethics Committee to identify strategies that help navigate seemingly innocuous, but ethically complex situations in clinical settings.  The APA 2017 Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct  will be referred to as starting point to address particularly complex clinical situations.  The APA Principles and Code is  given meaning by how individual clinicians navigate ambiguous clinical situations.  In this session, we will first describe ethically slippery slopes, then provide, and finally discuss, using clinical examples, straightforward strategies to address them as they appear in clinical psychology practice.  Time will be allotted for questions.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe an ethically slippery slope in the clinical practice of psychology.
  2. List three issues that contribute to the emergence of an ethically slippery slope possibly leading to an ethical dilemma.
  3. Use strategies to respond to a complex slippery slope situations in clinical practice.

Intermediate

5:30 p.m.

Reception, Networking, Raffle, and Awards*

Complimentary Hors d'oeuvres

 

Friday, April 12, 2019

7:30 a.m.

Business Meeting*

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast and Networking*

8:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary Session and Welcome

Keynote Address: The Opioid Epidemic - What It Says About Us and Lessons for Our Future

Joseph Lee, M.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Medical Director Youth Continuum, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

The opioid epidemic has inundated our country with tragedy. While efforts continue to prevent overdoses and implement effective treatments nationally, the epidemic speaks volumes about who we are as a people. Causes for the epidemic, who gets affected, how we think about drugs, our social discourse, and our very culture all are subject to scrutiny during this watershed moment in history. Intersections involving policy, economics, mental health, stigma, and equity issues will be examined through the lens of addiction in this talk. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe stigma and other cultural variables that contributed to/ propagate the opioid epidemic.
  2. Apply take home perspectives in dealing with substance use disorders.

Introductory

9:45 a.m.

Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment: Using Psychological Tests to Help Clients Change Their Lives (Part 1 of 3)

Raja David, Psy.D., ABPP, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

This program will introduce participants to the basic constructs and models associated with conducting Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessments (C/TA).  An overview of C/TA and how it differs from the traditional information gathering model of evaluation will be presented, with specific emphasis on Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment (TA).  The steps that are part of TA will be explained, with adolescent and adult clinical examples to illustrate the evaluator’s stance, tasks, and how to help clients gain insights from an individualized and collaborative approach to exploring psychological tests.  Participants will leave the presentation with additional knowledge and skills that will enhance their assessment practice and have a more meaningful impact on their clients.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Be able to list three differences between C/TA and a standard assessment.
  2. Be able to implement two changes to their standard assessment practices to make them more therapeutic.
  3. Be able to apply basic skills related to exploring test results with clients to help them gain insights and grow.

Introductory

9:45 a.m.

For Group Therapy Groupies: Getting started with Running Groups (Part 1 of 3)

Nate Page, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Staff Psychologist Carleton College, Student Health and Counseling

Most clinicians are well aware that group therapy is equally effective, and in some cases more effective, than individual therapy (Barlow et al., 2015). Through didactic and discussion components we will explore rationales for why group therapy is the best treatment modality for many clients and also address key logistical reasons (time, space, money, staffing) for why group approaches may be valuable in various clinical settings. We will also highlight considerations involving appropriate selection of clients, “selling” group to individual therapy clients, group screening and pre-group preparation, group process and development, Yalom’s 14-therapeutic factors of group therapy, co-leadership models, payment/insurance, training opportunities for clinicians, and resources for clinical practice guidelines.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain several unique benefits of a group therapy treatment approach for clients (as contrasted to an individual therapy approach).
  2. List several benefits of a group therapy treatment approach for providers.
  3. Describe how AGPA clinical practice guidelines could be applied to clinical practice and settings.

Introductory

9:45 a.m. 

Challenges in the Assessment and Treatment of PTSD

Christopher R. Erbes, Ph.D. LP, ABPP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, potentially debilitating, and at times controversial diagnosis. It's unique inclusion of a specified causal agent as part of the diagnosis ("Criterion A"), extensive overlap with other mental health conditions, and prominence in popular depictions of mental health problems lead to particular challenges with diagnosis and treatment. In this talk the presenter will review basic information on prevalence of trauma and PTSD, discuss the clinical manifestation of PTSD symptoms (and ways to differentiate them from other disorders), outline assessment strategies for the disorder, and review common (empirically supported) treatment practices for PTSD. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify and refute of a number of common misconceptions about trauma, PTSD, and its treatment.
  2. Describe common misconceptions in the prevalence, assessment, and treatment of PTSD and cite evidence regarding these myths.
  3. List elements of a multimodal assessment strategy for PTSD, and reasons for those elements.
  4. Explain characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of empirically supported therapies for PTSD.

Introductory

9:45 a.m. 

Challenges Posed by Current Payer Policies:  A Discussion with the MPA Payer Committee

Robert C. Van Siclen, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Private Practice, Coon Rapids, Minnesota and Child and Teen Medical Clinic – Fridley

Steve Girardeau, Psy.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Director of Clinical Services at Mental Health Systems

Dana Fox, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Private Practice, Minneapolis and St. Paul

Payer policies have shaped the practice of mental health for decades. It’s not just that those policies change how and what we get paid. In a fundamental way, payers determine what we do, with whom, for how long, the tools we use, even where we locate our offices.  Payer policies have changed the nature of our field and the science that underlies it.  We will review the history of payer-shaped modifications to the practice of psychology, including the impact changing payment models, like high deductible policies, have on our patients and our practices.  We will review what we have learned so far, especially over the past year.  We’ll ask for your input on ways we can be proactive rather than reactive, providing input and data to payers to encourage them to consider the impact their policies have on our patients in order to mitigate those impacts.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe at least three payment policies that influence the practice of psychological and behavioral intervention.
  2. List at least two challenges that psychologists have experienced in dealing with payers during the past year.

Intermediate

11:00 a.m.

Exhibit Viewing*

Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

11:15 a.m.

Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment: Using Psychological Tests to Help Clients Change Their Lives (Part 2 of 3)

Raja David, Psy.D., ABPP, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

This program will introduce participants to the basic constructs and models associated with conducting Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessments (C/TA).  An overview of C/TA and how it differs from the traditional information gathering model of evaluation will be presented, with specific emphasis on Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment (TA).  The steps that are part of TA will be explained, with adolescent and adult clinical examples to illustrate the evaluator’s stance, tasks, and how to help clients gain insights from an individualized and collaborative approach to exploring psychological tests.  Participants will leave the presentation with additional knowledge and skills that will enhance their assessment practice and have a more meaningful impact on their clients.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Be able to list three differences between C/TA and a standard assessment.
  2. Be able to implement two changes to their standard assessment practices to make them more therapeutic.
  3. Be able to apply basic skills related to exploring test results with clients to help them gain insights and grow.

Introductory

11:15 a.m. 

For Group Therapy Groupies: Getting started with Running Groups (Part 2 of 3)

Nate Page, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Staff Psychologist Carleton College, Student Health and Counseling

Most clinicians are well aware that group therapy is equally effective, and in some cases more effective, than individual therapy (Barlow et al., 2015). Through didactic and discussion components we will explore rationales for why group therapy is the best treatment modality for many clients and also address key logistical reasons (time, space, money, staffing) for why group approaches may be valuable in various clinical settings. We will also highlight considerations involving appropriate selection of clients, “selling” group to individual therapy clients, group screening and pre-group preparation, group process and development, Yalom’s 14-therapeutic factors of group therapy, co-leadership models, payment/insurance, training opportunities for clinicians, and resources for clinical practice guidelines.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain several unique benefits of a group therapy treatment approach for clients (as contrasted to an individual therapy approach).
  2. List several benefits of a group therapy treatment approach for providers.
  3. Describe how AGPA clinical practice guidelines could be applied to clinical practice and settings.

Introductory

11:15 a.m. 

Differential Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Early Childhood Neglect

Elizabeth Hooks, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Behavioral Health Dimensions, Director of Specialty Services

Bronwyn Neeser, M.A.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Saint Mary's University of Minnesota Student

Autism Spectrum Disorder is one of the most researched developmental disorders, and the epidemiology of ASD being monitored closely by the Center for Disease Control. However, there are many overlapping symptom criteria for ASD with other DSM-5 disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorders, Anxiety, Depression, and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Research has indicated that similar brain regions are impacted in both ASD and early childhood neglect, causing difficulties in social interaction and language development. This presentation will separate the behavioral presentations of both ASD and neglect.  It will describe what is known about the treatment of children with either ASD or early experiences of neglect, treatment outcome, and continued brain development.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify symptoms and behaviors commonly associated with early childhood neglect and Autism Spectrum Disorder;
  2. Define differences between symptoms and behaviors common to both early childhood neglect and Autism Spectrum Disorder; 
  3. Analyze common behaviors and symptoms and differentiate subtle variations based on diagnosis;
  4. Apply knowledge of subtle variations in behavior and symptomotology to clinical practice; 
  5. Apply resources and recommendations obtained from the presentation to future clients.

Intermediate

12:45 p.m.

Lunch*

2:00 p.m.

Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment: Using Psychological Tests to Help Clients Change Their Lives (Part 3 of 3)

Raja David, Psy.D., ABPP, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

This program will introduce participants to the basic constructs and models associated with conducting Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessments (C/TA).  An overview of C/TA and how it differs from the traditional information gathering model of evaluation will be presented, with specific emphasis on Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment (TA).  The steps that are part of TA will be explained, with adolescent and adult clinical examples to illustrate the evaluator’s stance, tasks, and how to help clients gain insights from an individualized and collaborative approach to exploring psychological tests.  Participants will leave the presentation with additional knowledge and skills that will enhance their assessment practice and have a more meaningful impact on their clients.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Be able to list three differences between C/TA and a standard assessment.
  2. Be able to implement two changes to their standard assessment practices to make them more therapeutic.
  3. Be able to apply basic skills related to exploring test results with clients to help them gain insights and grow.

Introductory

2:00 p.m.

For Group Therapy Groupies: Getting started with Running Groups (Part 3 of 3)

Nate Page, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Staff Psychologist Carleton College, Student Health and Counseling

Most clinicians are well aware that group therapy is equally effective, and in some cases more effective, than individual therapy (Barlow et al., 2015). Through didactic and discussion components we will explore rationales for why group therapy is the best treatment modality for many clients and also address key logistical reasons (time, space, money, staffing) for why group approaches may be valuable in various clinical settings. We will also highlight considerations involving appropriate selection of clients, “selling” group to individual therapy clients, group screening and pre-group preparation, group process and development, Yalom’s 14-therapeutic factors of group therapy, co-leadership models, payment/insurance, training opportunities for clinicians, and resources for clinical practice guidelines.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain several unique benefits of a group therapy treatment approach for clients (as contrasted to an individual therapy approach).
  2. List several benefits of a group therapy treatment approach for providers.
  3. Describe how AGPA clinical practice guidelines could be applied to clinical practice and settings.

Introductory

2:00 p.m. 

Who Makes the Rules?: The Differing Roles of Rules, Statutes, and Ethical Principles in Guiding Professional Conduct

Andrea Zuellig, Ph.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Melrose Center; Chair, MPA Ethics Committee

Scott A. Fischer, Ph.D., ABPP, LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Acumen Psychology, Private Practice; Member and Past Chair, Minnesota Board of Psychology

Bruce L. Bobbitt, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Immediate Past President, Minnesota Psychological Association

This interactive session will outline the similarities and differences between Ethical Principles and State regulatory requirements for the practice of psychology.  Professional associations such as the American Psychological Association (APA) develop Ethical Principles that are disseminated to all psychologists who are members of the association. The APA Ethical Principles have become a standard reference points for the clinical practice of psychology as have various evidence based professional and treatment guidelines.  At the same time, the practice of psychology in Minnesota is regulated by the Board of Psychology whose main purpose is the protection of members the public who receive services from Licensed Psychologists. The Board uses various strategies to ensure compliance with the psychology practice and its attendant rules. It is crucial that practicing psychologists understand both ethical principles and the compliance requirements of the psychology practice act in Minnesota and the roles of the MPA Ethics Committee and the Board of Psychology. While there is some overlap between them there are also important differences. This expert panel, consisting of the current MPA Ethics Chair and a current member of the Board of Psychology will highlight these similarities and differences, and will allow ample time for questions and discussion.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe and differentiate between ethics, rules and laws and apply that knowledge to their own practice.
  2. List particular resources for solving dilemmas based on statutes, rules or ethics.
  3. Explain the major difference between the function of ethics committees and the Board of Psychology.

Intermediate

3:15 p.m.

Exhibit Viewing*

Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

3:15 p.m.

Poster Viewing

This session provides an opportunity to review research studies, innovative clinical interventions, and case studies through engagement with researchers, program developers and clinicians who are presenting their work. CE credits are available for those who spend this hour in the poster viewing area.

4:15 p.m.

Clinical and Cultural Considerations for the Selection and Use of Evidence Based Practice Approaches for Co-Occurring Disorders

Michael Tkach, Psy.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Director of Recovery Management at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Evidence Based Practice (EPB) approaches are often considered best practice for providing care; however, there can be difficulties in determining which approach(es) to use when treating Co-Occurring Disorders. This session will focus on exploring how to approach selecting EBP interventions while considering four levels of cultural appropriateness including: the culture and treatment preferences of the patient as well as the culture and areas of competency of the clinician, the culture of the treatment setting, and the culture within which the theory used to construct the EBP approach is situated. These four areas of consideration will be explored in order to help empower clinicians to be better understand the selection process and practice considerations for implementing EBP approaches for the treatment of Co-Occurring Disorders.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Review the history and best practice processes for choosing evidence-based practice approaches for working with client populations.
  2. Identify how to take into consideration the cultural influences of the clinician, place of practice, and theory of practice being used in addition to the culture of the patient when providing evidence-based practice approaches.

Intermediate

4:15 p.m. 

Workforce Trends in the Clinical Practice of Psychology:   A View from the Minnesota Department of Health

Teri Fritsma Mogen, Ph.D.
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health

This session will focus on the workforce changes that are occurring in the State of Minnesota mental health delivery system with a focus on the clinical practice of psychology. The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) is legislatively mandated to survey all licensed health care providers in the state, including psychologists. MDH collects and analyzes this survey data to support legislative and post-secondary program decision-making; as an input for grant writing; and to respond to media questions about the mental health workforce in Minnesota. This presentation will provide a general overview of the licensed psychologist workforce in Minnesota, focusing on demographics, geographic distribution, work satisfaction and burnout, trends in telemedicine, cultural competence, and workforce shortages. Implications for the future clinical practice of psychology will be emphasized.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe at least 3 characteristics of the psychology workforce and its place within the broader mental health workforce in Minnesota.
  2. Explain two of the key divers in the psychology workforce shortage in Minnesota.

Intermediate

4:15 p.m. 

Chasing the American Dream: Is Immigration Really Worth It?

Macarena Corral, Psy.D., LP
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: CEO and Psychologist at the Center for Collaborative Health

During this presentation, we will be discussing the benefits and costs of immigrating to the United States. As part of this discussion, we will explore the impact of the current political climate on access and availability of services, treatment concerns, and what our role is as mental health providers.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

 

  1. Describe their own beliefs about immigration, and how these may impact their ability to help their clients.
  2. Apply knowledge of diverse cultures to explore the benefits and costs of immigration.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of Impact of current political climate on access and availability of services.
  4. Analyze our role as mental health providers with this population.

 

Intermediate

5:30 p.m.

Conference Adjourns

Bring completed evaluation form and CE attendance log to the registration table and pick up your CE certificate.

 

Click here to view a PDF summary of the schedule.

Each session is of a certain level as indicated by its presenter(s). The various levels are:
Introductory: Assumes post-doctoral education status and limited familiarity with topic.
Intermediate: Assumes post-doctoral education status and general familiarity with topic.
Advanced: Assumes post-doctoral education status and some specialized knowledge of topic.

 

Diversity Statement

The Minnesota Psychological Association actively encourages the participation of all psychologists regardless of age, creed, race, ethnic background, gender, socio-economic status, region of residence, physical or mental status, political beliefs, religious or spiritual affiliation, and sexual or affectional orientation.Although we are an organization of individuals from diverse cultures and backgrounds, the Minnesota Psychological Association also recognizes our core unifying identities as Psychologists who practice in America. We also recognize that we may hold unintentional attitudes and beliefs that influence our perceptions of and interactions with others. Within this context of unity and self-exploration, we are committed to increasing our sensitivity to all aspects of diversity as well as our knowledge and appreciation of the unique qualities of different cultures and backgrounds.We aspire to becoming alert to aspects of diversity, previously unseen or unacknowledged in our culture. In this spirit, we are committed to collaborating with multicultural groups to combat racism and other forms of prejudice as we seek to promote diversity in our society. To this end, we are dedicated to increasing our multicultural competencies and effectiveness as educators, researchers, administrators, policy makers, and practitioners.