82nd Annual Convention Schedule

A TOTAL OF 15 CE CREDITS ARE AVAILABLE

Program is subject to change at any time without notice

*CE Credits not awarded for these activities

Friday, April 20, 2018

 7:30 a.m. Breakfast and Networking*
Kiosk
8:00 a.m.

Opening Plenary Session
Regency Ballroom

Keynote Address: The Growing Maze of Acceptance Based Behavior Therapies: Same Wine, Different Bottle?

Kirk Strosahl, Ph.D., LP (Washington State); Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: HeartMatters Consulting LLC

The research and practice of psychotherapy has evolved over the last several decades in ways that are both beneficial and destructive. On the positive side, we have been able to identify a host of "evidence based" treatments (EBTs) for common mental health problems, and this has certainly raised the perceived relevance of psychological treatments in the age of “better living through chemistry”. Unfortunately, we seem to have become victims of our own success; there has been a runaway expansion in the number of seemingly distinct and unique manual based treatments. The inconvenient truth is that these treatments are costly to deliver, technically complex, and difficult to implement without additional post-degree training, which itself can be very costly to the field based psychologist. In addition, the rate of client treatment refusal and drop out in the current generation of EBTs is unacceptably high; treatment “non-participation” routinely approaches 50% of all patients that might benefit from a treatment.

As an alternative approach to the Tower of Babel created by the evidence based therapy movement, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and other new treatment models use a trans diagnostic approach that seeks to explain all forms of human suffering and psychopathology using a limited set of basic underlying processes. Recently however, this fundamental advance in thinking seems to be devolving into another race to develop and test even more disorder specific treatments, this time with the moniker, “mindfulness” or “acceptance” based.

This presentation will examine the core advantages of trans diagnostic models generally, and ACT specifically. As an example, we will discuss the trans diagnostic process of  “cognitive fusion” and show how the trans diagnostic process of mindful acceptance can be effectively used within a variety of clinical circumstances, rather than being turned into just another technique du jour. Finally, the “new look” evidence based treatments that are likely to be adopted by community based psychologists are likely to be trans diagnostically focused, less disorder-centric, less technically demanding as well as more acceptable to patients. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the core transdiagnostic features of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).
  2. List at least two controversies in the field of psychotherapy.

Intermediate 

 9:30 a.m. Exhibit Viewing*
Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

 9:45 a.m.

Tips on how to Approach Treatment of Adolescents with Chronic Pain from an Interdisciplinary Team Perspective – Part I

Conference Room D

Ashley N. Junghans-Rutelonis, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology from Oklahoma State University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Department of Pain, Palliative Care, and Integrative Medicine

Jennifer Waters, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Child Clinical Psychology from Florida School of Professional Psychology
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Department of Pain, Palliative Care, and Integrative Medicine

Alleviating chronic pain in children and adolescents is a key issue facing treatment providers across medical settings. This two part presentation will enhance attendees’ skills in identifying and treating children and adolescents with chronic pain. Content will focus on pediatric chronic pain, bio-psycho-social factors to consider when treating chronic pain, including language use and the mind-body connection, as well as evidence-based treatment strategies to improve functioning and pain management. Evidence based treatments from medical, physical therapy and psychological perspectives will be reviewed.

The second session will focus on hands-on learning that will include application of CBT, ACT, and in-vivo practice of integrative skills such as biofeedback, diaphragmatic breathing, guided imagery and hypnosis, mindfulness. Small groups of participants will practice clinical skills and attention will be given to using these skills across different practice settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List the characteristics of pediatric chronic pain.
  2. Describe the medical, psychological, and behavioral aspects of treating pediatric chronic pain, including the importance of language and the mind-body connection.
  3. Describe how evidenced based CBT, ACT or integrative skills are applied to reduce youth pain levels.

Intermediate 

 9:45 a.m.

Enhancing Empirically Supported Treatments with Marginalized Populations by Incorporating Social Determinants of Mental Health

Conference Room C

Talee Vang, Psy.D.; Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of St. Thomas
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hennepin County Medical Center

Collin Davidson, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Oklahoma State University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hennepin County Medical Center

The presenters will discuss the application of the social determinants of mental health in individual therapy in order to enhance empirically supported treatments (ESTs) in a safety net hospital setting. Case examples will be discussed to illustrate how ESTs (e.g., cognitive processing therapy) are enhanced by incorporating social determinants of mental health into the treatment process. The presenters outline how the Partners for Change Outcome Monitoring System can be used to determine if modifications to standard treatment protocols are enhancing outcomes and/or the therapeutic relationship.  Applications of the concepts reviewed to other settings are discussed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Demonstrate ways to incorporate the social determinants of mental health into empirically supported treatments.
  2. Apply the Partners for Change Outcome Monitoring System to improve overall outcome and decrease dropout in psychotherapy.

Intermediate

 9:45 a.m.

Building an Ageless Brain for a Vital Life – Part I

Conference Room E

David Alter, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Neuropsychology from Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Partners in Healing of Minneapolis

Contemporary neuroscience research recognizes that while genetics and acquired diseases impact the trajectory of brain health, lifestyle choices and actively practiced brain-healthy skills play a far greater neuroprotective role than previously assumed. This two-part workshop will first explore the human approach/avoidance systems and its underlying brain structures followed by a review of ten core skills that both modern neuroscience and ageless wisdom traditions identify as key to living an engaged, meaning-filled, and rewarding life.

Part two of the workshop focuses on the application of brain-science findings and wisdom gleaned from ancient traditions to the practice of psychotherapy today. The role of attachment and both self and interpersonal regulation as psychobiological “meta-skills” essential to any form of psychotherapy are highlighted. The application of these skills to mood disturbances, anxiety spectrum conditions, including trauma and psychophysiological disorders are reviewed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List brain structures and brain networks involved in attention, desire, deliberation, and reactivity as they relate to the approach/avoidance system.
  2. Describe the ten core skills that build long-term brain health, which functions as the foundation for vital living.
  3. Explain how findings from ancient traditions can be applied to the practice of psychotherapy today.

Intermediate

  9:45 a.m.

The Crisis Mental Illness is Presenting for Corrections & Mental Health Providers

Conference Room F

Frank Weber, M.S., LP; M.S. in Clinical Psychology from St. Cloud State University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: CORE Professional Services PA

The most common way for seriously mentally ill individuals to get into the mental health system today is by being arrested. A report presented by the Minnesota Sheriffs’ Association to the Minnesota legislature in 2016 indicated that approximately 30% of our current jail population is mentally ill. This session will offer solutions to this crisis by focusing on data from the presenter’s 22 years of operating CORE Professional Services PA and the recidivism data collected by the Department of Corrections on CORE Professional Services PA’s clients. These data are seen as core information for clinicians who work with mentally ill people. Based on this work, strategies that can be used by clinicians across different practice settings are suggested.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the problems created by incarceration being the most likely outcome for mentally ill offenders.
  2. List different treatment options and system changes that could lead to better outcomes for people with mental illness.

Introductory

11:00 a.m. Exhibit Viewing*
Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field. 

11:30 a.m.

Tips on how to Approach Treatment of Adolescents with Chronic Pain from an Interdisciplinary Team Perspective – Part II

Conference Room D

Ashley N. Junghans-Rutelonis, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology from Oklahoma State University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Department of Pain, Palliative Care, and Integrative Medicine

Jennifer Waters, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Child Clinical Psychology from Florida School of Professional Psychology
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Department of Pain, Palliative Care, and Integrative Medicine

Alleviating chronic pain in children and adolescents is a key issue facing treatment providers across medical settings. This two part presentation will enhance attendees’ skills in identifying and treating children and adolescents with chronic pain. Content will focus on pediatric chronic pain, bio-psycho-social factors to consider when treating chronic pain, including language use and the mind-body connection, as well as evidence-based treatment strategies to improve functioning and pain management. Evidence based treatments from medical, physical therapy and psychological perspectives will be reviewed.

The second session will focus on hands-on learning that will include application of CBT, ACT, and in-vivo practice of integrative skills such as biofeedback, diaphragmatic breathing, guided imagery and hypnosis, mindfulness. Small groups of participants will practice clinical skills and attention will be given to using these skills across different practice settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List the characteristics of pediatric chronic pain.
  2. Describe the medical, psychological, and behavioral aspects of treating pediatric chronic pain, including the importance of language and the mind-body connection.
  3. Describe how evidenced based CBT, ACT or integrative skills are applied to reduce youth pain levels.

Intermediate

11:30 a.m.

Men and Vulnerability: Why Vulnerability is Difficult for Men and How to Help

Conference Room C

Len Jennings, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of St. Thomas

Tim Balke, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Family and Social Science from University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of St. Thomas

Drawing from research exploring men’s issues, as well as from personal and professional experiences, three generations of therapists will share personal and professional learnings and strategies for helping men appreciate and perhaps even embrace vulnerability. Presenters will discuss the importance of vulnerability in the therapy process the difficulty men have with vulnerability, and ways to help men become more vulnerable in therapy and relationships. Strategies and skills that can be used by therapists in different practice settings are suggested.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List three reasons why men have difficulty with vulnerability.
  2. Describe three strategies for helping men be more vulnerable in therapy and their relationships.

Introductory

11:30 a.m.

Building an Ageless Brain for a Vital Life – Part II

Conference Room E

David Alter, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Neuropsychology from Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Partners in Healing of Minneapolis

Contemporary neuroscience research recognizes that while genetics and acquired diseases impact the trajectory of brain health, lifestyle choices and actively practiced brain-healthy skills play a far greater neuroprotective role than previously assumed. This two-part workshop will first explore the human approach/avoidance systems and its underlying brain structures followed by a review of 10 core skills that both modern neuroscience and ageless wisdom traditions identify as key to living an engaged, meaning-filled, and rewarding life.

Part two of the workshop focuses on the application of brain-science findings and wisdom gleaned from ancient traditions to the practice of psychotherapy today. The role of attachment and both self and interpersonal regulation as psychobiological “meta-skills” essential to any form of psychotherapy are highlighted. The application of these skills to mood disturbances, anxiety spectrum conditions, including trauma and psychophysiological disorders are reviewed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List brain structures and brain networks involved in attention, desire, deliberation, and reactivity as they relate to the approach/avoidance system.
  2. Describe the 10 core skills that build long-term brain health, which functions as the foundation for vital living.
  3. Explain how findings from ancient traditions can be applied to the practice of psychotherapy today.

Intermediate

11:30 a.m.

Building Competence as a Clinical Trainee: How to get the Most from your Clinical Training and Supervision

Conference Room F

Kiah Bizal, Psy.D.; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Postdoctoral Fellow at A Better Connection, Inc.

Stephanie Born, Psy.D.; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Clinical Psychology Child Fellow at Hennepin County Medical Center

Supervision and how it is structured and delivered is a crucial part of becoming skilled psychologist and clinician.  The presenters review key supervision evidenced based practices  that are currently a focus in psychology. Psychotherapy, developmental, and process models of supervision will be reviewed. A semi-structured approach will be used to highlight the important issues that occur in the supervisory relationship. These include attention to ethical issues, which include supervisor competence, responsible use of power, multicultural supervision and boundary issues. Throughout, the presenters goal is to engage participants in these important issues so that recipients can get the most value from their clinical training and supervision.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1.  List ethical standards related to supervision and clinical training.
  2.  Describe how the supervisory process assists in the development of clinical skills.

Introductory

12:45 p.m. Annual Business Meeting and Lunch*
Regency Ballroom
2:00 p.m.

Interventions in Pediatric Primary Care Behavioral Health: The Science and the Art Behind Current Best Practices

Conference Room F

Vang Xiong Skibbie, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hennepin County Medical Center

Mark Lynn Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Marquette University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hennepin County Medical Center

This program will briefly cover the history/background and present-day state of pediatric primary care behavioral health (pediatric PCBH), reviewing theoretical and empirical support for this model. A primary focus will be on the full integration model of primary care behavioral health using the Pediatric PCBH practice at Hennepin County Medical Center as an example. The presentation will also focus on pragmatic implementation strategies for pediatric PCBH interventions that are grounded in empirical support. These include brief, time-limited, and focused treatment targeting pediatric behavioral health concerns such as ADHD, depression, behavioral concerns, and health-related stressors amongst others. The presenters will also discuss the implications of this model for clinicians practicing in other settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain the core components underlying effective implementation of pediatric PCBH (primary care behavioral health).
  2. Effectively apply current pediatric PCBH interventions that are grounded in empirical work, supporting implementation of the most appropriate avenues for intervention.

Introductory

2:00 p.m. 

Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders - Assessment, Overlap, and Treatment - Part I

Conference Room D

Cheri Kuhn, M.A., LPCC; M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the University of St. Thomas
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Emily Program

Michael Butchko, Ph.D.; Ph.D in Counseling Psychology from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Emily Program

Tishanna Hollins, Ph.D.; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Texas Tech University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Emily Program

There is a high rate of comorbidity between eating disorders and substance use disorders. This presentation will provide an introduction to anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder as well as substance abuse disorders. Diagnostic comorbidity will be highlighted and symptom substitution will be discussed as symptoms frequently oscillate when they are targeted independently. Although treatment protocols for this comorbidity are still in their infancy, an overview of historical treatment models and current standards of practice will be provided. The presentation will also include a review of the treatment options and resources that are available in Minnesota. The presenters also discuss treatment issues for clinicians who work in different types of practice settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the key findings of current research on eating disorders and substance abuse.
  2. Demonstrate how to assess for both the presence of eating disorders and substance abuse.
  3. Explain how current addiction models can be applied to eating disorder treatment.

Intermediate

2:00 p.m. 

Assessing Clinical Competence: ASPPB Development of the Enhanced EPPP

Conference Room C

Jacqueline Horn, Ph.D., LP (California); Ph.D. in Psychology from Peabody College, Vanderbilt University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Director of Regulatory Affairs, Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB)

Emil Rodolfa, Ph.D., LP (California); Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Texas A&M University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Distinguished Professor, California School of Professional Psychology/Alliant International University and Chair of the EPPP Part 2 Implementation Task Force, Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB)

The aim of this session is to describe the enhanced Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) which will consist of two parts: an examination of candidates’ foundational knowledge and an examination of candidates’ skills. The current status of the development of the enhanced EPPP, including the exam blueprint, item types, the timing of the knowledge and skills portions of the EPPP, and a research project using data gathered during the beta testing of the skills portion, will be discussed. Questions, comments, and discussion will be encouraged.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the blueprint for the EPPP Part 2 and how it was developed.
  2. Compare how knowledge and skills will be assessed using the enhanced EPPP.

Introductory

2:00 p.m.

Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment: Using Psychological Tests to Help Clients Change Their Lives - Part I

Conference Room E

Raja David, Psy.D., ABPP, LP; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

This two part presentation will introduce participants to the basic constructs and models associated with conducting Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessments (C/TA). An overview of C/TA and how it differs from the traditional information gathering model of evaluation will be presented, with specific emphasis on Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment (TA). The steps that are part of TA will be explained, with adolescent and adult clinical examples to illustrate the evaluator’s stance, tasks, and how to help clients gain insights from an individualized and collaborative approach to exploring psychological tests.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List three differences between Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment and a standard assessment. 
  2. Discuss the key tenants of Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment.
  3. Describe two changes that can be made to standard assessment practices to make them more therapeutic and beneficial to clients.

Introductory

3:15 p.m. Exhibit Viewing, MPA Committee and Division Fair*

Exhibit Hall
Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

3:15 p.m. Poster Viewing

Conference Room B

This session provides an opportunity to review research studies, innovative clinical interventions, and case studies through engagement with researchers, program developers and clinicians who are presenting their work. CE credits are available for those who spend this hour in the poster viewing area. Please click here to view the poster presentation schedule.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the research project for each poster presentation.
  2. List the key findings of the research from each poster presentation.
4:15 p.m.

The Basics of Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)

Conference Room F

Elizabeth Wagner, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fuller Theological Seminary, Graduate School of Psychology
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: ELEOS Psychology Center

This presentation will describe the basic tenants Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). The core content will be a description of the manualized process of PCIT as an early intervention for children ages 2-7 years old. Participants will learn how PCIT can be used to improve the relationship between parent and child, improve child behavior and increase family system functioning.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain the process of PCIT.
  2. Describe the parenting skills taught during the two phases of PCIT and how treatment progress is assessed.

Intermediate

4:15 p.m.

Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders - Assessment, Overlap, and Treatment - Part II

Conference Room D

Cheri Kuhn, M.A., LPCC; M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the University of St. Thomas
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Emily Program

Michael Butchko, Ph.D.; Ph.D in Counseling Psychology from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Emily Program

Tishanna Hollins, Ph.D.; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Texas Tech University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: The Emily Program

There is a high rate of comorbidity between eating disorders and substance use disorders. This presentation will provide an introduction to anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder as well as substance abuse disorders. Diagnostic comorbidity will be highlighted and symptom substitution will be discussed as symptoms frequently oscillate when they are targeted independently. Although treatment protocols for this comorbidity are still in their infancy, an overview of historical treatment models and current standards of practice will be provided. The presentation will also include a review of the treatment options and resources that are available in Minnesota. The presenters also discuss treatment issues for clinicians who work in different types of practice settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the key findings of current research on eating disorders and substance abuse.
  2. Demonstrate how to assess for both the presence of eating disorders and substance abuse.
  3. Explain how current addiction models can be applied to eating disorder treatment.

Intermediate

4:15 p.m. 

Exploring the Complexities of Co-occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders: An Interactive Discussion About Approaches to Assessment, Treatment, and Ongoing Disease Management

Conference Room C

Michael Tkach, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation/ Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies

Tim R. Portinga, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology from St. Thomas University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Tim Helmeke, M.A., LADC; M.A. in Addiction Counseling from Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

This interactive symposium featuring clinical leaders from the nation’s largest non-profit addiction treatment provider will explore the complexities of co-occurring mental health and addiction diagnoses. The discussion will feature an interactive panel and audience discussion component that will provide insights into differential diagnosis, acuity and complexity of this patient profile, and risks to ongoing recovery. Topics will include intervention and assessment, treatment approaches, and systemic barriers and challenges with mental health and substance use disorder treatment. Come prepared with questions or case studies to discuss with the panel of experts.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe some of the major complexities of providing comprehensive services to individuals diagnosed with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.
  2. Discuss various approaches and adaptations that are important to consider when providing a variety of mental health and treatment related services to individuals diagnosed with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorder diagnoses.

Introductory

4:15 p.m. 

Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment: Using Psychological Tests to Help Clients Change Their Lives - Part II

Conference Room E

Raja David, Psy.D., ABPP, LP; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

This two part presentation will introduce participants to the basic constructs and models associated with conducting Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessments (C/TA). An overview of C/TA and how it differs from the traditional information gathering model of evaluation will be presented, with specific emphasis on Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment (TA). The steps that are part of TA will be explained, with adolescent and adult clinical examples to illustrate the evaluator’s stance, tasks, and how to help clients gain insights from an individualized and collaborative approach to exploring psychological tests.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List three differences between Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment and a standard assessment. 
  2. Discuss the key tenants of Finn’s (2009) model of Therapeutic Assessment.
  3. Describe two changes that can be made to standard assessment practices to make them more therapeutic and beneficial to clients.

Introductory

5:30 p.m. Reception, Networking and Raffle*
Coppenhagen Room
Complimentary Hors d'oeuvres

 

Saturday, April 21, 2018

7:00 a.m. Breakfast and Networking*
Kiosk
7:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary Session
Regency Ballroom

Keynote Address: Using Engagement with Clients and Their Families to Improve Outcomes

Sue Abderholden, M.P.H.; Masters of Public Health Administration from the University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Executive Director, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Minnesota (NAMI MN)

This presentation will outline how people with mental illness can and do recover and live productive lives. Two key ingredients are necessary for this to happen. From a treatment perspective, recovery is aided and supported not only by effective psychotherapy and medication but by active involvement of family and peers. Therapists and physicians are encouraged to connect with and mobilize family members and peers as part of the treatment process. The second ingredient is parity, ensuring that mental health care is treated like other types of healthcare, including in payment rates, access to a broad array of services and treatment, access to new treatments, and network adequacy. Participants are urged to recognize the importance of strong advocacy for people who need assistance. The steps that NAMI is taking to improve the system are described.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe how treatment and family support can support recovery.
  2. List the steps being taken by NAMI to advocate system changes that promote recovery.

Intermediate

9:00 a.m.

Exhibit Viewing*
Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

9:15 a.m.

The Role of Professional Mentorship Across the Career Span of Psychologists

Conference Room C

Bronwyn Neeser, M.A.; M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Doane College
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Doctoral Student in Counseling Psychology, St. Mary’s University

Robin McLeod, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Educational Psychology, Counseling & Student Personnel Psychology, University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Counseling Psychologists of Woodbury, P.A.

BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Texas Tech University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Brakins Consulting & Psychological Services; African American Child Wellness Institute

This presentation offers a review of some of the current research into the use, benefits, ethics, and importance of professional mentorship relationships within professional psychology. Mentorship has played a critical role in the professional development of psychologists since the early days of the field. Building on the research reviewed, the three presenters will describe the important role that mentorship has played in their own careers. Mentorship is conceptualized as multidimensional concept - it is important at all points in the career cycle and mentors learn much from their mentees. Virtually all successful professional psychologists identify mentors as not only important, but crucial to their growth and maturity. The presenters will also discuss mentorship across different professional settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Demonstrate the scaffolding that mentorship offers across professional career development.
  2. Analyze the experience of both mentor and mentee to gain a better understanding of the relationship.

Intermediate

9:15 a.m.

Behavioral Health Intervention for Chronic Pain

Conference Room E

Mark Goetz, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from University of North Dakota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Allina Health System

This session will provide attendees with a foundation for better understanding issues related to cognitive-behavioral strategies for chronic pain. A brief overview of gate control theory and biopsychosocial theory will be provided. More general discussion on the use of other cognitive behavioral concepts and strategies such as  relaxation training, cognitive appraisal of and coping with pain experience, activity-rest cycling, problem solving skills, pleasant activity scheduling/behavioral activation, interpersonal effectiveness, maintenance will be provided. The various ways that these strategies can be used in various types of medical settings will be described. 

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe biopsychosocial aspects of assessment and treatment of individuals with chronic pain.
  2. List limitations and benefits to patients and other providers for use of cognitive-behavioral techniques for chronic pain in an integrated medical setting.

Introductory

9:15 a.m. 

Developing and Implementing CBT Strategies for Co-Occurring Disordered Clients Part I

Conference Room D

Hal Baumchen, Psy.D., LP, LADC; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Illinois School of Professional Psychology
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Northland Counseling Services; NorthStar Regional Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment Program; Journey to Recovery

There is now good evidence supporting the use of specific interventions with clients who have co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. These clients often need concrete and practical treatment materials in order to achieve long-term recovery. This workshop presents ten key integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) strategies that can be implemented immediately to increase overall clinical effectiveness for clients with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. Building on core knowledge of CBT, specific interventions that identify client strengths, challenge negative thinking, enhance the therapy process and develop positive recovery skills will be described.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe complexities of co-occurring disorders. 
  2. List ten key integrated CBT strategies.
  3. Explain how CBT strategies can be used to assist clients with processing difficulties.

Intermediate

9:15 a.m. 

Creating Meaningful, Consumer-Focused Psychological Assessment Reports

Conference Room F

Lexi Schmidt, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from University of Missouri - Columbia
Professional or Work Affiliation: Mental Health Systems, PC

Terry Poe, B.A.; B.A. in Psychology from University of South Dakota
Professional or Work Affiliation: Mental Health Systems, PC

This program will provide an overview of the main issues relevant in creating meaningful, consumer-focused psychological assessment reports in addition to practical strategies to address these issues for psychologists. Main points identified by scholars in the literature as well as a review of current suggestions, strategies, and frameworks will be discussed. Participants will be provided with a set of practical, applied strategies to create consumer-focused reports that psychologists can use in their own practice or incorporate into their training process for students/interns.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe relevant research and literature on creating consumer-focused psychological assessment reports.
  2. Apply practical strategies for improving the readability and meaningfulness of reports for use in participants' own practice or training programs.

Intermediate

10:30 a.m.

Exhibit Viewing*
Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

11:00 a.m.

Legislative Efforts to Improve the Practice Environment for Psychologists and Those We Serve: A Discussion with the MPA Legislative Committee

Conference Room C

Trisha A. Stark, M.P.A., Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from University of Miami
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Private Practice and legislative advocacy

William J. Amberg, M.A., J.D.; J.D. in Law from American University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Amberg Law Office

Michael Brunner, Ph.D., LP, ABPP; Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: HealthPartners

Steve Girardeau, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of St. Thomas
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Mental Health Systems, PA

Sarah Wiljamaa, M.A; M.A. in Clinical Psychology from Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Doctoral Student in Clinical Psychology at Minnesota School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University

A central responsibility of MPA is to provide protection for psychologists, a function carried out in part by its Legislative Committee. In this presentation, the Legislative Committee will: summarize the accomplishments of the 2017 legislative session, describe efforts underway in the current legislative session, and speculate about issues on the horizon. Empowering members to have their viewpoints and concerns heard by government and regulatory entities will be emphasized. Ample time will be provided for member questions and input.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Analyze legislative issues, formulate questions, and provide input on legislation needed to support psychology.
  2. Demonstrate ways to engage in advocacy for psychology and the individuals we serve.

Intermediate

11:00 a.m. 

The Treatment of Maladaptive Perfectionism: Key Constructs, Assessment Tools and Interventions

Conference Room E

Randall Morris-Ostrom, Psy.D., LP, J.D.; Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology from University of St. Thomas
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Headway Emotional Health Services; University of St. Thomas

Many interventions have been developed that target perfectionism directly. The prevailing explanation is that perfectionism is a transdiagnostic process that increases vulnerability to mental health disorders and maintains disorders that develop. Only a relatively small number of randomized controlled trials have been completed, but those trials have reported decreased levels of perfectionism and, more significantly, clinically significant decreases in depression, anxiety, and eating disorders along with effect sizes ranging from moderate to large. This presentation will review literature on perfectionism, describe several measures of perfectionism, and introduce participants to approaches to the treatment of perfectionism.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the major definitional issues concerning perfectionism and differentiate between the three- and six-factor models of perfectionism.
  2. Apply measures of perfectionism and semi-structured treatment protocols to decrease maladaptive perfectionism in clients.

Introductory

11:00 a.m. 

Developing and Implementing CBT Strategies for Co-Occurring Disordered Clients Part II

Conference Room D

Hal Baumchen, Psy.D., LP, LADC; Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Illinois School of Professional Psychology
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Northland Counseling Services; NorthStar Regional Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment Program; Journey to Recovery

There is now good evidence supporting the use of specific interventions with clients who have co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. These clients often need concrete and practical treatment materials in order to achieve long-term recovery. This workshop presents ten key integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) strategies that can be implemented immediately to increase overall clinical effectiveness for clients with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. Building on core knowledge of CBT, specific interventions that identify client strengths, challenge negative thinking, enhance the therapy process and develop positive recovery skills will be described.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe complexities of co-occurring disorders. 
  2. List ten key integrated CBT strategies.
  3. Explain how CBT strategies can be used to assist clients with processing difficulties.

Intermediate

11:00 a.m. 

A Population Health-Based Model for Health Behavior Change in Primary Care

Conference Room F

Michelle Sherman, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from University of Missouri-Columbia
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: University of Minnesota, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

Stephanie Hooker, Ph.D., MPH; Ph.D. in Clinical Health Psychology from University of Colorado-Denver
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: University of Minnesota, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

This program will challenge psychologists in primary care settings to think beyond a primarily mental health focus (addressing common problems of depression, anxiety, and substance abuse) to a broader conceptualization of how to help providers and patients with health behavior change (HBC). Presenters will briefly review the literature on evidence-based HBC interventions that can be employed in a primary care setting. A multimodal, multidisciplinary (psychology, pharmacy, and dietician) approach to increasing physician confidence in implementing brief HBC interventions will also be described. Preliminary findings from the evaluation of this project will also be presented.  Also discussed are ways that these kinds of interventions can be used across different practice settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain several brief interventions for health behavior change that can be implemented in a primary care setting.
  2. Describe a multi-component intervention to teach physicians about how to promote health behavior change in their patients.

Intermediate

12:15 p.m. Award and Volunteer Recognition Luncheon*
1:30 p.m.

Measuring Outcomes of Care: Use of the APA/APAPO Mental and Behavioral Health Registry in Clinical Practice

Conference Room C

C. Vaile Wright, Ph.D., LP (District of Columbia); Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Director of Research and Special Projects, Practice Directorate, American Psychological Association

Bruce L. Bobbitt, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Child Psychology from University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: President, Minnesota Psychological Association and Member of the APA/APAPO Mental & Behavioral Health Advisory Committee

One of the key, yet elusive, goals in behavioral health is to identify and use outcome measures that provide useful information for both clinicians and patients/clients. A second goal is to promote the use of measures and metrics that can be used to monitor and improve treatment effectiveness across  populations of patients and consumers. This presentation will review the development of the Mental and Behavioral Health Registry (MBHR) by the American Psychological Association/Practice Organization. The MBHR , which houses 37 measures, was approved as a Qualified Clinical Data Registry in late 2017 by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid  Services (CMS) and is currently operational. The presenters also will review the importance of this registry for use in the CMS Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) as well as the advantages of using the registry for practicing clinicians. The MBHR is the only approved behavioral health registry that has measures that screen for anxiety disorders and allow reporting of anxiety disorder treatment response. The presentation will provide practical information about how to use the registry in clinical practice. The presenters will also review regulatory compliance and quality improvement issues in the use of outcome measures and metrics.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List the key features of the Mental and Behavioral Health Registry (MBHR).
  2. Describe how to use the MBHR in clinical practice.

Intermediate

1:30 p.m.

Integrated Behavioral Health in the CentraCare Health System: Expanding Across the Care Continuum

Conference Room E

Toni Mahowald, Psy.D., LP; Psy.D in Clinical Psychology from William James College
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: CentraCare Health

A recent analysis completed by the State of Minnesota indicates that there are 340 people to every one licensed mental health provider in metropolitan areas. In stark contrast, rural areas have 2,000 people to every one licensed mental health provider (Leibert & Fritsma 2017). CentraCare Health is a rural healthcare system that serves approximately 700,000 residents across 12 counties. CentraCare Health’s mission and vision has allowed for rapid adoption of Integrated Behavioral Health (IBH) services. Three iterations of IBH integration are described with an emphasis on the challenges and opportunities presented by each. The presentation will encourage participant participation in describing different models of IBH and how they may vary by clinical practice settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the supports needed to successfully expand from Primary Care Behavioral Health to Integrated Behavioral Health (IBH) Care across the care continuum.
  2. Identify and anticipate potential barriers to expansion across the care continuum and how they may be addressed.

Introductory

1:30 p.m. 

The Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on Adult Health: Implications for Assessment and Treatment in Traditional and Integrated Practices

Conference Room F

Scott Palmer, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Brigham Young University 
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Behavioral Health Clinic, Centracare Health

Lori Listug-Lunde, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from University of North Dakota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Behavioral Health Clinic, Centracare Health

The original adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) study by Felitti et al. in 1998 suggests that maltreatment and household dysfunction in childhood are strongly associated with high-risk health behaviors and are also correlated with chronic health conditions. The implications of the ACEs study are far reaching in the current US healthcare landscape that has shifted toward a framework that embraces the Triple Aim, which calls for systems of care that delivers excellent quality of care, at optimized costs, while improving the health of the population. Psychologists and mental health providers in traditional or integrated practices play a crucial role in any team-based model of care that strives to achieve the Triple Aim. This presentation will provide an overview of the original ACEs study, will introduce you to the adult and pediatric versions of the ACEs questionnaire, and will engage the audience in ways psychologists and mental health providers can impact population health and help communities achieve the Triple Aim. The presenters will also review clinical practices that can be used in different settings to help this population of clients.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of the ACE's study to improve patient health in traditional or integrated practices.
  2. Recognize the importance of assessing ACEs to help meet the Triple Aim.

Intermediate

1:30 p.m. 

How to Screen for, Diagnose and Treat Substance Use Disorders in Psychological Practice - Part I

Conference Room D

Mark Willenbring, M.D.; M.D. in Medicine from University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Alltyr Clinic

In this interactive two part workshop, participants will learn about the neurobiology and phenomenology of addiction. Based on this core foundation, evidence-based screening tools used for the diagnosis of Substance Use Disorders, and treatment will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to practice taking what is learned in the presentation and applying it in role plays and other exercises. The focus of the didactic presentation, discussion and role plays will be to increase participant skill in screening for, diagnosing and providing basic CBT-based treatment for Substance Use Disorders. Special attention will be given to the long-term management of substance use, including how to respond to recurrences. Also addressed is the issue of how to use these skills in different clinical settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain the epidemiology of alcohol and other substance use disorders.
  2. Describe current screening and diagnostic methods for substance use disorders.
  3. Discuss current anti-relapse medications and their application.

Introductory

2:45 p.m.

Exhibit Viewing*
Exhibit Hall

Visit with exhibitors as they discuss with you the latest products & services in the field.

2:45 p.m. Poster Viewing
Conference Room B

This session provides an opportunity to review research studies, innovative clinical interventions, and case studies through engagement with researchers, program developers and clinicians who are presenting their work. CE credits are available for those who spend this hour in the poster viewing area. Please click here to view the poster presentation schedule.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the research project for each poster presentation.
  2. List the key findings of the research from each poster presentation.
3:45 p.m.

The Great Slim Down: Collaborative Treatment of Obesity and Depression in a Primary Care Setting

Conference Room C

Bethany Fiebelkorn Kennedy, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D in Counseling Psychology from University of Denver
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hennepin County Medical Center

Natalie Ikerman, M.P.A.S., PA-C ; M.P.A.S in Physician Assistant Studies from Augsburg College
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Hennepin County Medical Center

This session will present the clinical implementation of a weight loss program in a diverse primary care clinic within Hennepin County Medical Center. Relevant medical and psychological assessments used to clarify diagnoses, identify treatment goals, and develop individualized treatment plans for patients participating in the program with co-morbid obesity and depression will be described. Presenters will also focus on the use of evidence based interventions to support the treatment of co-occurring obesity and depression in primary care including individual health and behavior interventions, brief, short-term psychotherapy for depression, lifestyle coaching, medication management, and collaboration with specialties services such as nutrition and psychiatry. The presenters will also discuss how the model in this presentation may be applied across different clinical settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. List the benefits and limitations of treating co-morbid obesity and depression in a primary care setting and describe the value of interdisciplinary collaboration.
  2. Explain relevant medical and psychological assessment and intervention approaches used to treat co-morbid obesity and depression in a primary care setting.

Intermediate

3:45 p.m. 

Finding the Solution for Restoring Treatment-Resistant Patients with Delusional Ideation: Using an Empirically Supported Practice, Michael’s Game, Aimed at Targeting Hypothetical Reasoning Ability

Conference Room E

Jennifer Lewey, Ph.D.; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Human Services, Direct Care & Treatment – Forensic Services

Rebecca Kastner, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, Psychology and Law Concentration from University of Alabama
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Forensic Examiner, State Operated Forensic Services

This presentation addresses the important issues of using psychological interventions with people who are experiencing psychotic symptoms - especially delusion ideation. Michael’s Game, (Khazaal et al., 2006), a treatment for delusional ideas in the form of a card game, is an empirically-supported cognitive behavioral therapy for psychotic symptoms. Research indicates that the intervention has demonstrated a decrease in patients’ distress and preoccupation associated with delusional beliefs over time. Attendees will be trained in this intervention as well as have the opportunity to observe a live demonstration implementing the intervention as it would be applied with clients of varying psychological acuity. This presentation will demonstrate both the need and feasibility of adding a cognitive remediation method to inpatient treatment for patients who present with delusional ideation. Also discussed is the applicability of this treatment in diverse clinical settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Apply a theoretical understanding of the Michael’s Game intervention for use with patients with severe and persistent mental illnesses, especially those with delusional ideation.
  2. Analyze effectiveness research from the literature as well as pilot studies that aim to highlight this intervention’s overall goals and success as a means of (1) reducing distress associated with delusional beliefs, and (2) demonstrating its effectiveness in restoring patients to competency.

Introductory

3:45 p.m. 

Access to Quality Care - The Impact of Payer Policies on the Delivery of Psychological Services and Behavioral Healthcare: A Discussion with the MPA Payer Committee

Conference Room F

Robert Van Siclen, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Child Psychology from the University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Private Practice

Janette Concepcion, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Kent State University
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Private Practice

Dana Fox, Ph.D., LP; Ph.D. in Child Psychology from the University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Private Practice

The world is changing for private practitioners and for mental health clinics. Payers have been reducing our reimbursement rates directly, by paying us less, and indirectly, by restricting the use of 90837, our traditional “clinical hour” of just over 50 minutes. Insurance companies have been open about their policies of not credentialing small or solo practices, especially within the metropolitan area. New networks have been created that exclude many established providers. The Payer Committee has explored each of these developments to see if there are ways that we can mitigate the impact of these policy changes. In this presentation, we will share our experiences, our conclusions, and our recommendations. We will explore the possible impact these developments are likely to have on our profession, our business models, and, most important, on our ability to be accessible and to serve our patients, especially our most vulnerable patients.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the impact of payment policies on patient populations.
  2. List the difficulties psychologists are encountering in working with payers.

Intermediate

3:45 p.m. 

How to Screen for, Diagnose and Treat Substance Use Disorders in Psychological Practice - Part II

Conference Room D

Mark Willenbring, M.D.; M.D. in Medicine from University of Minnesota
Current Professional or Work Affiliation: Alltyr Clinic

In this interactive two part workshop, participants will learn about the neurobiology and phenomenology of addiction. Based on this core foundation, evidence-based screening tools used for the diagnosis of Substance Use Disorders, and treatment will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to practice taking what is learned in the presentation and applying it in role plays and other exercises. The focus of the didactic presentation, discussion and role plays will be to increase participant skill in screening for, diagnosing and providing basic CBT-based treatment for Substance Use Disorders. Special attention will be given to the long-term management of substance use, including how to respond to recurrences. Also addressed is the issue of how to use these skills in different clinical settings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Explain the epidemiology of alcohol and other substance use disorders.
  2. Describe current screening and diagnostic methods for substance use disorders.
  3. Discuss current anti-relapse medications and their application.

Introductory

5:00 p.m.

Conference Adjourns

Bring completed evaluation form and CE attendance log to the registration table and pick up your CE certificate.

 

Click here to view a PDF summary of the schedule.

Each session is of a certain level as indicated by its presenter(s). The various levels are:
Introductory: Assumes post-doctoral education status and limited familiarity with topic.
Intermediate: Assumes post-doctoral education status and general familiarity with topic.
Advanced: Assumes post-doctoral education status and some specialized knowledge of topic.

 

Diversity Statement

The Minnesota Psychological Association actively encourages the participation of all psychologists regardless of age, creed, race, ethnic background, gender, socio-economic status, region of residence, physical or mental status, political beliefs, religious or spiritual affiliation, and sexual or affectional orientation.Although we are an organization of individuals from diverse cultures and backgrounds, the Minnesota Psychological Association also recognizes our core unifying identities as Psychologists who practice in America. We also recognize that we may hold unintentional attitudes and beliefs that influence our perceptions of and interactions with others. Within this context of unity and self-exploration, we are committed to increasing our sensitivity to all aspects of diversity as well as our knowledge and appreciation of the unique qualities of different cultures and backgrounds.We aspire to becoming alert to aspects of diversity, previously unseen or unacknowledged in our culture. In this spirit, we are committed to collaborating with multicultural groups to combat racism and other forms of prejudice as we seek to promote diversity in our society. To this end, we are dedicated to increasing our multicultural competencies and effectiveness as educators, researchers, administrators, policy makers, and practitioners.